Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The Town House Book Review

The Town House
 

by

Norah Lofts


Rating: 4 out of 5

Genre: Historical Fiction


In the latter part of fourteenth century England, Martin Reed is a young man being trained by his father to be a smith. He is owned by the lord of a manor in Rede, Norfolk.

One day he rescues a frail young girl from a beating by her stepmother. He is immediately taken with her and vows to marry her. When going before the lord of the manor to ask for her hand in marriage, the lord sets his eyes on Kate and refuses their marriage request.

Martin, in a fit of anger, punches the lord in the face, is beaten to the point of death and left to die. His father does nothing to save him and leaves him for dead. Martin plans an escape from the manor leaving everyone to think him dead, taking Kate with him.

Their long and arduous journey to leave Norfolk and begin a new life together almost costs both their lives. They are aided by an old woman and end up in the town of Baildon in Suffolk. The law states that if they remain free for one year and one day, they will have their freedom.

Martin and Kate begin a life of poverty in the the town of Baildon where Martin changes his name to Walter. He and Kate struggle with earning a living and raising a family, plagued by hunger, unfair labor laws, and the power that the Abbey has over the town.

The story is told through the eyes of the main characters, alternating with pieces told in third person. The Town House is not a novel that focuses on the elite of fifteenth century England, but tells the daily struggles of the down-trodden, impoverished, and sadness of medieval times. It shows--to me--that there always has been and always will be cruelty, unfairness, and greed. Yet there is always hope and good people who dispense it with generosity.

Norah Lofts is a masterful storyteller. The Town House is the first in a trilogy with the second installment being The House at Old Vine, and the third, The House at Sunset.

If you like The Town House, you will probably like anything by Catherine Cookson aka Catherine Marchant.

"Remember this: whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows generously will also reap generously." - 2 Corinthians 9:6

5 comments:

  1. Carole, I'm delighted that you're enjoying Norah Lofts. I learned soooo much English history from her. And the good news is that she wrote loads so you have lots of pleasure in store.

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  2. Stan,thanks so much for visiting. Wasn't she an amazing historical writer? Donna Fletcher Crow told me about this trilogy. I am now on book two, The House at Old Vine. Have you read Donna's book, Glastonbury? It is a wonderful historical fiction novel.

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  3. Hi Carol,
    I discovered your blog from a comment on Marji's blog.

    I love hot tea and ice tea.

    This fall my husband and I hope to travel to Europe for the first time. We want to go to Seville where our college son will spend a semester. Got to pay his way first, then we'll see. If we go do you have any suggestions? I bet being a travel agent gives you lots of story ideas.

    It's good to discover your blog.

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    1. Hi Jackie,

      Thanks so much for visiting my blog. I'm with you on the hot 'and' iced tea! They are interchangeable whatever the season.

      Congrats on going to Europe this year. Depending on how much time you have there, I have lots of places you should see! Haha! My favorite place of all is, of course, the U.K. I did go to Madrid a couple of years ago but we did not have the time to do any of the countryside, unfortunately. The Prado is a must-see museum, though. Have plenty of time available--it can be overwhelming.

      Please let me know how it goes. I would love to see pictures. If you have any questions you are welcome to e-mail me at carole_johnson@att.net.

      Thanks and God bless!

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  4. Thanks, Carol. I'll let you know how it goes.

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